Tag Archives: Chicago art

StudioLab Sound Art Series

Joe-Wallace-Turntabling-Rare-RecordsStudioLab has its roots in sound-one of the earliest versions of the art space itself was rooted in recording and sound installations.

StudioLab returns to its sound-based roots with a series of sound art projects that include appropriation of old vinyl records, found sound, field recording, and other manipulation of audio.

The first of these projects is in progress, and we’ll provide samples soon…as well as an artist statement for this series and some other musings.

The StudioLab philosophy with sound art includes the idea that sound artists have an added challenge when it comes to their work-sound is all around us every day, and it can be difficult to create art that feels different and new, removed from the soundscapes that surround us all day, every day.

One notion being studied and investigated in this work includes the following idea: as a painter I have enjoyed the luxury of making work that is easier to show as a unique object. People don’t encounter paintings all day, every day. Is it harder to entice an audience using raw materials that we experience from the moment we wake to the moment we fall asleep?

More details are coming.

Wino Art Show Sponsored by StudioLab Now Online

AWinoOn Saturday June 25, StudioLab hosted/curated Wino, an art show by Patrick Ogle featuring paintings and other art on reclaimed wood from wine boxes. The reception was held in StudioLab’s exhibition space at 1579 N. Milwaukee in Chicago’s Wicker Park neighborhood, and the physical show is available by appointment only from now until Saturday July 2nd.

The online version of the show is available for viewing and purchase at http://www.constantlyconsumingculture.com/. There have already been a number of works sold, but there is still a nice variety of work available to purchase. Don’t miss this one-of-a-kind art show! Here are just a few of the works available from now until July 25 2016:

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Size Matters Art Show Feb 26-28 2016 At StudioLab

Size Matters Art Show StudioLab Chicago Art

We all pretend it doesn’t, but size matters. This isn’t about anatomy; it is about space. Who has the room to hang a gigantic painting or photograph? Most of us live in fairly small places and we need small art.

To this end Mapanare.us and StudioLab present “Size Matters” via ConstantlyConsumingCulture.com. The show opens Friday, February 26 and runs until Sunday February 28. An online version of the show runs from Monday, February 29 until March 16, 2016. The opening reception takes place Friday, February 26 from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m.

All the art in this show is the size of a legal U.S. postcard. Pieces are rectangular, at least 3-1/2 inches high by 5 inches long and no more than 4-1/4 inches high by 6 inches long. We are making some allowances for pieces that are three dimensional. Art comes from painters, photographers, video and mixed-media artists. Artists come from all over the USA (and one from Mexico). At the bottom of the release are links to artist websites.

Artists are charged no fees and get the total amount of any piece sold in person or online (processing fees for credit cards and shipping are added to the cost).

Artists set to appear (we may add some); Renee McGinnis (Chicago) Gabriel Martinez (Philadelphia), John Airo (Chicago), Samantha Eden Oakey (Miami), Gretchen Hasse (Chicago), Kimberly Fitzgerald (San Diego), James Messersmith (Los Angeles), Elyse Martin (Chicago), Joe Wallace (Chicago), Manzana Oscura (Mexico City) Areli Leon (Chicago).

reneemcginnis.com

gabrielmartinez.com

johnairo.com

gretchenhasse.com

elysemartin.com

joe-wallace.com

New Work: Artificial Landscapes

Joe Wallace New abstract paintings Chicago

I’ve been working on some new pieces lately and they’ve taken on a life of their own…this has quickly turned into a series that shows no signs of stopping. At first I thought they might be some kind of unholy addendum to that (comparatively) little canon of Neo Plasticism, but after a lot of staring at these damn things it seems clear (to me, hah) that the origin of these images is  a lot  more practical, meaningful (to me)  and interesting than just riffing on an early 20th Century style .

I won’t give the game away, though–telling people what to think of your art feels about the same as giving away the ending of the new murder mystery thriller–it’s a cheat to the viewer who is busy forming their own ideas and opinions about what they are looking at.

A good 50% of the first-time viewing experience for any piece of art (in my mind, anyway) is deciding whether or not you like it or not, then the rest of the battle is drawn up around WTF it means, if anything, or whether it’s simply aesthetically great but isn’t making some kind of statement.

A lot of times, in my own art experiences, I’ve arrived at the “Statement” conclusions a lot later on, realizing that I had missed something crucial about what I was looking at the first time around. Sort of like watching a movie and missing a key plot detail and asking your neighbor what’s going on, I found myself needing that extra little bit of context or info to clue me in.

Case in point:

I once saw a sculpture of what appeared to be a lion or an impression of a “Chinese dragon”. It was made entirely out of cardboard and while I thought the piece was an impressive bit of tenacity and patience while assembling all those little pieces of cardboard, I hate to admit that i felt that otherwise, so what?

Imagine how stupid I felt when someone mentioned in passing, almost by accident, “It’s made entirely out of Nike shoe boxes”. And then that sculpture seemed like an entirely political statement, and a really pointed one at that.

That’s when I decided I couldn’t really judge any piece of art by my first impressions of it any more.

But I digress. This series of new work is a mixed media thing–I’m using acrylics on pine board, pen and ink on water color paper and a lot of other variations…but the end results are the same.

The blue and red piece is ink on watercolor paper, the yellow and black is acrylic on pine. I’m working an ongoing series of these for a show coming later this summer at StudioLab on the 5th floor of the Bridgeport Art Center.

These pieces aren’t technically for sale just yet, but there has been some early interest expressed, so if you want to know about  viewing and purchasing, please get in touch with me at jwallace242@gmail.com for details.

Joe Wallace Bridgeport Art Center abstract Art

Chicago abstract art Joe Wallace red blue 2

Chicago artist Joe Wallace blue red 1